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The Way of the Fox

21
Jul

bowtiesandbatman:

But can we 

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Just take a moment

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To appreciate

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Back muscles??

(via tomcanspankmehardy)

21
Jul
21
Jul

orangefranco:

Hands

Hello, you lovely Marvel boys you~

21
Jul
It was funny, the first draft of the script it was a 65’ Mustang. My next door neighbor pimps out rides for a living, that’s what the guy does. And he tricks out classic automobiles. He happened to be outside and I was outside, and I said “Hey man” I said “Let me ask you a question. I’m writing this script, and they guys are - y’know - supposed to be in this muscle car crusin’ around the country. And I’m thinking like a 65’ Mustang. What do you think?” And he said “Oh yeah a 65’ Mustang’s perfect… if you’re a pussy.” And I said “Oh, well I can’t use that, then what car should I use?” And without hesitation, he said “67’ Chevy Impala. Cause’ you can fit a body in that trunk.” Eric Kripke. SPN Featurette Just a friendly reminder that we have our lovely Metallicar model as a 67’ Impala because of Kripke’s next door neighbor. And also, possibly, why the boys drive a 65’ Mustang in “My Heart Will Go On”. (via i-am-mishafuckingcollins)

(via aplacecalledorange)

21
Jul
thrithwig:

king-of-the-casuals:

I’m just gonna let the world figure this out

thrithwig:

king-of-the-casuals:

I’m just gonna let the world figure this out

(via valhallalagoon)

21
Jul

Sebastian Stan, aka the talented asshole who did most of his own stunts and chose to use the heavier arm more often than not. [x][x]

(Source: holahydra, via durance)

21
Jul
alicexz:

Are you afraid of the big bad wolf?
Sketchy thing to help deal with my 50th Anniversary feels

alicexz:

Are you afraid of the big bad wolf?

Sketchy thing to help deal with my 50th Anniversary feels

(via aplacecalledorange)

21
Jul
roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via all-four-cheekbones)

21
Jul

cruelbritannia:

I love that you can clearly see Evans go “SHIT” and Stan go “WOW” and Scarlett definitely reacts, but then plays it off like it’s no big deal. 

(Source: bbuchanann, via durance)

5
Jul

July 4, 2014, 12:00am

yogscasteden:

about-a-llama:

angel-of-the-chuck:

Americans:

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Everyone else:

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that’s probably how americans feel about eurovision

this is probably how ameri… Oh

(Source: assgardianassbutt, via sipral)

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